Articles

Sunday is Link Day!

Business / project management “Case studies and experiments demonstrating the impact of performance optimization on user experience and business metrics.”: http://wpostats.com/ It’s always the right time to revisit the beans-up-noses article: https://medium.com/uie-brain-sparks/beans-and-noses-21c16ac5cade Uncle Bob chimes in on Volkswagen: http://blog.8thlight.com/uncle-bob/2015/10/14/VW.html “Welcome to Traction Stack, a curated directory of marketing resources from six years of research for Traction, the bestselling…

Wednesday is Link Day!

Business / Working Life Data is not an asset, it’s a liability: https://www.richie.fi/blog/data-is-a-liability.html Strategic procrastination: https://the-pastry-box-project.net/erin-mckean/2015-September-11 Putting on the shipping goggles: https://signalvnoise.com/posts/3931-putting-on-the-shipping-goggles (if you’re not a regular reader of Signal vs Noise then you should be) Reduce the distance between the people who make decisions about the product and the people who build the product:…

The tough truth of reality

I make no secret of the fact I’m a huge progressive enhancement believer. The fundamental reason why I believe the vast majority of web sites (yes, and web apps) should be written using progressive enhancement principles is that we just don’t know how they will be accessed. We live in a time where many of…

Wednesday is Link Day

A super bumper jumbo crop for you :0) UX Interface writing – code for humans: http://nicolefenton.com/interface-writing/ The best interface is no interface: http://www.nointerface.com/book/ Making companies competitive by expanding design’s role: http://www.uie.com/articles/expanding_design/ (more UIE goodness) Style guides best practices, a presentation by Brad Frost: http://www.slideshare.net/bradfrostweb/style-guide-best-practices?sf9856760=1 Wonderful presentation by Jared Spool on building delightful UX: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewpz2gR_oJQ Performance…

Progressive enhancement matters

I’m a bit of a progressive enhancement nut. Some people think it doesn’t matter. It does. A lot. Here’s a very recent example. I just tried to pay for a quick weekend break next year, booked through TripAdvisor. The “pay now “button didn’t work. Why did it fail? Because it’s not a submit button: <input class=”ftlPaymentButtonInner…

From social media

May 6, 2020, 11:59 am

Some people who know me well may not quite have heard me correctly, so I'll repeat: I'm learning React. Does this mean I'm turning my back on the principle of Progressive Enhancement? Does it mean I'm going to start building websites which are 99% JavaScript and 1% everything else? Have I given in? No, dear reader, my opinions - shaped by luminaries like Jeremy Keith, Alex Russell, Tim Kadlec and many others - have not changed. The web is neck-deep in JavaScript and sinking deeper all the time, and organisations drinking the SPA framework kool-aid think that browsers are waving not drowning. There are two reasons I'm learning this framework - and I'll also be looking at Vue as well (I already have some commercial experience with Angular). Firstly, when talking with teams and encouraging them to reduce their reliance on JavaScript for core functionality I've repeatedly received a "but you don't understand it!" response. I do understand it, my 20+ years building websites hasn't been spent hiding under a rock. JavaScript is cool, I get it, This "but we're building a web app, not a static site" is a common fallacy, and in a large part fuelling the current untenable position. I've not yet found anyone who can explain the difference between an "app" and a "site", and most grudgingly accept there's a big grey area between the extremes of a rarely-updated content site and, say, GMail. Most projects involve a mixture of slow and fast-moving information. If I learn React then I can counter the lack-of-understanding argument. I can speak in the language of die-hard Reactians (is that the right word) and - hopefully - put across some reasons why core functionality should be delivered using the simplest technology possible (generally server-side generated HTML). Secondly, I expect to fail to convince many people to use less JavaScript. So I want to have some practical examples of apps that use React (or any JavaScript framework) in a less all-or-nothing way. After all, I don't see any reason why this should be delivered to a browser: <!doctype html> <html> <head> <title>MY 'app'</title> <script src="my-huge-bundle.js"></script> </head> <body> <div id="app"></div> </body> </html> If I learn React maybe I can implement some new patterns that will incorporate a Progressive Enhancement mindset. I may fail at both those aims, of course. In which case I will still have learnt a new technology.